Accessing Your yDNA Test Results on FamilyTree DNA

A fellow Whipple reported that he received an email in the past few days from FamilyTree DNA, informing him that some of his Y chromosome DNA test results were available. He indicated that he didn’t know how to access the results. I recalled that when I first received my test results, it took me several weeks to “discover” where the results were on the web site. With that in mind, I’ve decided to share how I accessed my test results.

Step 1. Follow the link to your myFTDNA account

The email has a section that says something like:

Follow the link below to access your myFTDNA account.
Your Kit Number is xxxxxx
http://www.FamilyTreeDNA.com
“History Unearthed Daily”

Jot down your Kit Number and visit http://www.FamilyTreeDNA.com.

Step 2. Log into FTDNA

On the left section of the page,

  • enter your Kit Number in the first field, then
  • enter your password. (The email you received when you ordered the test should have your password. If you can’t remember it, click on the “Forgot Your Password?” link.)

Step 3. View your Y-DNA Results

The next page should say “Welcome to your Family Tree DNA personal page!”

The first time I saw the page I was scared away. There are two places on the page that will show you the test results. On the left-hand “navigation bar,” scan down until you see “Y-DNA.” Beneath that heading, you will see these links:

  • Matches
  • Haplotree
  • Ancestral Origins
  • DYS Values
  • Print Certificate/Report/Data

(You will see the very same links a ways down on the main [right-hand side of the] page, with explanatory prose.)

The rest of this blog entry tells you how to click on the five links just mentioned. Feel free to skip the rest of these instructions, unless you need further help. (Hint: Your haplotree is on the page you view when you click the Haplo tree link.)

Step 4. Click on “Matches”

You should see the “Y-DNA Matches” page. Scroll to the bottom to see some test recipients whose tests exactly or closely match your results. (If you’re lucky, you might see some other Whipples. In my case, four other Whipples are listed. There is also one exact match with a different surname.)

My page shows four sections:

  1. 12 Marker – Exact Match
  2. 25 Marker – Exact Match
  3. 37 Marker – Genetic Distance – 2
  4. 67 Marker – Genetic Distance – 3

Step 5. Click on “Haplotree”

(The “Haplotree” link should still be in the left navigation bar, under “Matches.”)

After Flash finished drawing the page, look near the top, on the right part of the page. On my page, I see:

My Predicted Haplogroup: R1b1b2   Shorthand: R-M269

Those two values represent your haplogroup (and a shorthand identifier for it …). (Compare those values to what you see on the “Results” tab of this Whipple DNA blog.

If you’re interested in sharing, I’m very interested in your haplogroup and shorthand value.

I’ll not mention you by name on this blog–to protect your privacy. However, I’d like to include you in the summary numbers).

On the same page, you can click “Frequency Map” and “Migration Map” to learn more about your ancestors’ possible migration paths.

Step 6: Click on “Ancestral Origins”

(The “Ancestral Origins” link should be in the left navigation bar, under “Haplotree.”)
Read where they think your ancestors came from. (You may be very surprised!)

Step 7: Click on “DYS Values”

(The “DYS Values” link should be in the left navigation bar, under “Ancestral Origins.”)

You might want to print this page (clicking on the “Print This Page” button on the top right.”)

I’m not sure what all the values mean, but they’re useful if you want to search another yDNA database. I googled for some yDNA databases, and finally settled on Genetree, at www.genetree.com.
On that site, I clicked the “Sign Up” link at the top of the page (then used my signup when I return to that site).

After entering the site, I did the following:

  1. Clicked on the “DNA” menu item near the top of the page, then “Y-DNA Profile” on the drop-down.
  2. On the “Y-DNA Results” page, I clicked on “Markers” and then “Edit,” to get a page of Markers with blanks to enter the Values. The Markers correspond to “DYS#” on the FTDNA printout; the Values correspond to “Alleles” on the FTDNA printout.
  3. After I filled in as many blanks as I could (yes, I left some blank), I saved it.

On the Genetree site, it reported that I had 49 matches–many more than I did on the FamilyTree DNA site.

Step 8: Click on “Print Certificate/Report/Data

The page has two PDF certificates and one Migration Map. You can also download your Y-DNA Matches as CSV (“comma separated values”) files (for importing to a spreadsheet, etc.)

Well, that’s about all I have to say. Feel free to click around on other parts of the FTDNA site.

Feel free to add anything (as a comment) that you think I’ve missed. (I might even update this page if necessary …)

Good luck!