Another Whipple in DNA Haplogroup T

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported by at least one Ipswich Whipple descendant is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


This past week I received another email from a patrilineal Whipple descendant whose Y chromosome DNA shows him in the T haplogroup.

Thus far, all but one patrilineal descendant of the Ipswich/Bocking/Bishop’s Stortford have reported being members of the T haplogroup. (Descendants of the Rhode Island Whipples have been members of the R1b or R1b1b2 haplogroup).

If you are stuck trying to decide between two candidate Whipple ancestors living in the same geographical area–one an Ipswich Whipple descendant and the other a Rhode Island Whipple descendant–a Y DNA test might help you choose between the two candidates.

If you are a male with surname Whipple and your Whipple ancestry follows the fathers’ lines back to the most distant known Whipple, a Y DNA test might prove to be a tie breaker in choosing between two possible ancestors.

If you are a female Whipple and have a brother or Whipple cousin, try to encourage them to have a Y DNA test. (All it takes is four swabs from inside the mouth, submitted to a lab for testing.)

The price of tests continues to drop. For the purposes described above, a minimal number of markers (a 12-marker test, for example) should be sufficient. Some labs offer a 12-marker Y DNA test for $49.00. Periodic “specials” by competing labs cost even less.

If you are a patrilineal Whipple descendants and your haplogroup begins “R1b,” you are likely a Rhode Island Whipple. If The haplogroup name begins “T,” you are probably an Ipswich Whipple. (Note: One Ipswich Whipple descendant has reported being in haplogroup I2b1. If you are in that haplogroup, then you are likely his cousin.)

Good luck in your research!

See last year’s post for a Whipple DNA Summary and Overview.