All posts by dnasearcher

Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in DNA Testing

Last evening I spoke briefly with a friend of mine who is a genetics professor at a local university. I asked him in passing if I’m missing anything new in genealogical DNA since I first read about Y DNA and mtDNA. He responded with the following in an email:
Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP’s) are now becoming the most commonly diagnosed markers for molecular genealogy due to sheer numbers and relative ease/low cost of doing the assays.  23andme is the biggest SNP analyzing company and they have a huge database (800,000+) of clients they have surveyed with over 900,000 genome-wide markers (not just on the Y and mtDNA).

Continue reading Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in DNA Testing

Another Whipple in DNA Haplogroup T

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported by at least one Ipswich Whipple descendant is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


This past week I received another email from a patrilineal Whipple descendant whose Y chromosome DNA shows him in the T haplogroup.

Thus far, all but one patrilineal descendant of the Ipswich/Bocking/Bishop’s Stortford have reported being members of the T haplogroup. (Descendants of the Rhode Island Whipples have been members of the R1b or R1b1b2 haplogroup).

Continue reading Another Whipple in DNA Haplogroup T

Ipswich Whipple Y-DNA … So Far

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported by at least one Ipswich Whipple descendant is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


This past weekend I received a report from yet another patrilineal descendant of Matthew Whipple (b. 1590). He reported his haplogroup as T1. Previous Ipswich Whipples had reported haplogroups T (without the 1) and I2b1. One disconnected Whipple also reported a haplogroup of T.

At this point I’m guessing that T and T1 are close matches. (Slight mutations can occur as generations pass. Might T1 be a mutation of T, I wonder?)

Continue reading Ipswich Whipple Y-DNA … So Far

HUGE DNA News!

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported by at least one Ipswich Whipple descendant is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


During the past 2-3 years (or more?), patrilineal descendants of the Rhode Island and Ipswich MA Whipples have been submitting DNA for testing. During that time, known Rhode Island descendants (descendants of Captain John Whipple at http://whipple.org/366) have belonged to haplogroup:

  • R1b1b2

Continue reading HUGE DNA News!

DNA Test Results … So Far

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported by at least one Ipswich Whipple descendant is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


The very small sample of Y Chromosome DNA test results submitted so far seems to indicate that the Ipswich (Massachusetts) Whipples and the Providence (Rhode Island) Whipples don’t share a “recent” common ancestor.

Rhode Island (Samuel, Eleazer), 3+ test results:
Haplogroup R1b1b2 (R-M269)
Ipswich (Matthew), 2 different test results 1 test result:
Haplogroup I2b1
Haplogroup T (T-M70)
If you are a patrilineal male descendant Matthew or John of Ipswich, or of John of Providence, we welcome results of your yDNA tests.

Another Match!

Four days ago I received another email with the subject: “Family Tree DNA Y-DNA12 Test Match 12 for 12,” indicating that yet another Whipple is a descendant of Captain John Whipple of Providence, Rhode Island. Because Family Tree DNA has a strict privacy policy, I’m not certain who that person is. (I do see, however, that there are five Whipples listed whose Y-DNA 12 Test matches mine.)

If you also received notification about four days ago–and you just recently had your DNA tested, feel free to email the webmaster— especially if you are uncertain of your Rhode Island connection!

–W

12-Marker Y-DNA Test for $99.00!

This week Christopher Congdon reported a way to purchase a 12-marker Y Chromosome DNA test from FamilyTree DNA: Visit https://www.familytreedna.com/order-form.aspx?ty=58&Group=Whipple&code= — it takes you directly to the page for the 12-marker test.

As I mentioned in an earlier post: the 12-marker Y-DNA test should be sufficient for the objectives of the Whipple Website’s tests — to see it the Ipswich MA and Providence RI Whipples have a “recent” common ancestor.
Before you run out and plunk down your $99.00: Make sure you are a male patrilineal Whipple descendant! (That means that your Whipple ancestry goes back through fathers’ lines as far as you know; it probably means that your surname is Whipple.)
I hope to see more test results from descendants of Ipswich Whipples, Matthew (http://whipple.org/5946) and John (http://whipple.org/5890). We’re still looking for common haplogroup trends among their descendants.
(Last time I checked, I THINK I saw about 49 tests of Rhode Island Whipple patrilineal descendants, all with a common haplogroup. All “Rhode Island Whipple descendants) trace their ancestry to the John Whipple at http://whipple.org/366.)

Which Y-DNA Test?

Now that I’ve had time to look at the results of different relatives’ Y-DNA tests, I have formulated a new opinion about which Y-chromosome DNA tests are best. The tests with the fewest “markers” (which are also the cheapest) are probably sufficient–for starters, at least.

A 12-marker test ought to be sufficient to for a male Whipple to determine whether he is a biological patrilineal descendant of the earliest Rhode Island ancestor, Captain John Whipple (See http://whipple.org/366) Unfortunately, FamilyTree DNA doesn’t seem to offer a 12- or 25-marker test. The “starter test” advertised on their web site (http://www.familytreedna.com) is the 37-marker test. (They also offer a 67-marker test–considerably more expensive.)

Continue reading Which Y-DNA Test?

Ipswich Whipple Y DNA: More Uncertainty

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported by at least one Ipswich Whipple descendant is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


A few days ago I posted preliminary results of an Ipswich Whipple Y Chromosome DNA test. That test indicated no close relationship between the Rhode Island Whipples and that descendant of Matthew Whipple (brother of John) of Ipswich.

Two days ago I received another Y DNA report from another descendant of the same Matthew. (Matthew is the nearest common ancestor of both individuals.) Those DNA results were also different from the Rhode Island Whipple DNA results. Unfortunately, the two Ipswich Whipples DNA tests don’t match each other: both Ipswich Whipples have different Y DNA results.

Continue reading Ipswich Whipple Y DNA: More Uncertainty

Accessing Your yDNA Test Results on FamilyTree DNA

A fellow Whipple reported that he received an email in the past few days from FamilyTree DNA, informing him that some of his Y chromosome DNA test results were available. He indicated that he didn’t know how to access the results. I recalled that when I first received my test results, it took me several weeks to “discover” where the results were on the web site. With that in mind, I’ve decided to share how I accessed my test results.

Step 1. Follow the link to your myFTDNA account

The email has a section that says something like:

Continue reading Accessing Your yDNA Test Results on FamilyTree DNA

Preliminary yDNA Test Results: Ipswich and R.I. Whipples Not Closely Related?

Webmaster’s note 17 April 2016: There is reason to suspect that the haplogroup T reported below is not a Y-DNA haplogroup, but instead a mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroup.  As a Y-DNA Haplogroup, T is found primarily in southern Asia and Australia; it is extremely rare in northern Europe. As a mitochondrial haplogroup, on the other hand, it is very common in Europe.


Yesterday I received an email reporting the results of Y Chromosome DNA tests of an 8th great grandson of Matthew Whipple (born about 1590, died 28 Sep 1647) of Ipswich, Massachusetts.

(Recall that Matthew and his brother John–both born in Bocking, Essex County, England–sailed from England to Ipswich, Massachusetts, in about 1638. John was born about 1596 and died 30 Jun 1669.)

The 8th great grandson mentioned above is of Haplogroup T (Shorthand T-M70).

Continue reading Preliminary yDNA Test Results: Ipswich and R.I. Whipples Not Closely Related?

Do the DNA.Whipple.org and the Whipple DNA project work together?

I just read the following question on the RootsWeb Whipple mailing list:

So do the DNA.Whipple.org and the Whipple DNA project work together or are they complete separate entities. What is the best way to do an DNA test? Would the National Geographic test work as well? I was interested in that project before I started researching my ancestry but have not done any at this time. Looking forward to seeing what develops.

Here is a response from the co-coordinator for the Whipple group (posted to the same mailing list):

Continue reading Do the DNA.Whipple.org and the Whipple DNA project work together?

67 Marker Y Chromosome DNA Test Results Arrived Today

Today I received an email from FamilyTree DNA, informing me of the results from the 67 Marker DNA test ordered earlier. (This completes the tests I’ve ordered.)

In searching the Y DNA databases, I have found several other Whipples with 90% or greater matches to my DNA, all of them descendants of Captain John Whipple of Dorchester, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island.

Continue reading 67 Marker Y Chromosome DNA Test Results Arrived Today

Update: Trace Your Roots with DNA

Last night I finished reading the book Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree by Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak and Ann Turner (Rodale, 2004; ISBN 1-59486-006-8). I strongly recommend it to anyone seriously interested in genetics and genealogy. Here are a few things I learned/concluded.

Y-DNA Testing

Of the two primary DNA tests used in genealogical research, the Y Chromosome DNA test interests me the most. It seems like a perfect match for determining whether the Whipples from Rhode Island and the Whipples from Ipswich, Massachusetts/Bocking, England share a common ancestor–or not. Learning that information can help researchers focus their pre-New World Whipple genealogical research.

mtDNA Testing

Continue reading Update: Trace Your Roots with DNA

The Whipple DNA Project at worldfamilies.net

As proof that I’m still a “newbie” at genealogical DNA research, I realized this afternoon that the Whipple DNA Project has been around for at least two years at http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/whipple/. Even more surprising (to me) is that my pedigree is already online. (I recall uploading it somewhere a month or so ago. This afternoon I realized that it is posted–with a few others–at the worldfamilies.net URL mentioned above.)

Approximately two years ago Blaine Whipple submitted a document announcing the beginning of the Whipple Surname Family Tree DNA Project. (You can view the document at http://whipple.org/dna.pdf.) Although the offer described in that document has expired, prices of DNA testing have decreased since the document was created.

Continue reading The Whipple DNA Project at worldfamilies.net